Connections

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Connections are used to create modular synthesizers in Module Mode.

AudioGL has a variety of connection types. Each of these connection types have their own specific rules for when they can and cannot be connected. It is recommended that you have a good understanding of these rules prior to creating new synthesizers.

Contents

Overview

The Main Connection System
Fig 1.0

AudioGL offers three central connection systems:


Main Connection System

AudioGL's Main Connection System controls the downstream flow of data in a project. A connection chain always starts with a Sequencer Module. The sequencer is connected to sound generating modules, such as the Oscillator Module and the Sampler Module. The generated sound is passed on to effects modules. The Output Module will receive the final signal, and send it to your audio driver, or to Rewire if you are using AudioGL as a Rewire Slave.

The main connection system allows Feedback under certain conditions. For the most part, if you try to make a loop in the main connection system, AudioGL will reject the connection. To understand how to work with Feedback, read the section on Masters, Slaves and Feedback Loops below.

Here are the different connection types available, along with the their respective connection rules:

Connection Type Color Connection Rules Picture
Sequencer Connection Green
  • Sequencer Outputs can be connected to Sequencer Inputs with the same amount of voices.
  • Sequencer Outputs cannot be connected to Sequencer Inputs with a different amount of voices.
  • Sequencer signals can be sent through Envelope Modules to perform envelope gating. Read the Gating article for details.

SequencerConnection.jpg

Audio Connection Brown
  • Audio Outputs can be connected to Audio Inputs with the same amount of voices.
  • Polyphonic Audio Outputs can be connected to Monophonic Audio Inputs. The separate voices will be summed automatically.
  • Polyphonic Audio Outputs cannot be connected to Polyphonic Audio Inputs with a different amount of voices.
  • Monophonic Audio Outputs cannot be connected to Polyphonic Audio Inputs.
  • On Undecided Modules, Audio Outputs can be sent to Feedback Inputs, regardless of polyphony.
  • On Undecided Modules, Audio Inputs can be connected to Feedback Outputs, regardless of polyphony.
AudioConnection.jpg
Feedback Connection White
  • Feedback Outputs can be connected to Audio Inputs on Undecided Modules. The undecided module will be converted to a Slave Module.
  • Feedback Inputs can be connected to Audio Outputs on Undecided Modules. The undecided module will be converted to a Slave Module.
  • Feedback Outputs cannot be connected to Feedback Inputs.
  • Feedback Connections cannot be connected to Master Modules.

FeedbackConnection.jpg

Masters, Slaves and Feedback Loops

Some of AudioGL's modules can have programmable feedback loops.

For example, the Reverb Module can be fed through an Equalizer Module. This Equalizer can be used to boost or remove various harmonics from the reverb's feedback loop. The result of this can be anything from an ethereal soundscape, to something very harsh and tinny, depending upon your personal preferences and selection of modules.

If you are Boosting a Feedback Loop:

Understand that Feedback Loops are prone to making very loud noises. AudioGL features a Hard Limiter, which will not allow a feedback loop to exceed a certain threshold, but once that threshold is reached, the feedback loop will cause the rest of your song to be obscured by the limiter.

Still, excessive amounts of feedback can occasionally sound great. To work with heavy feedback, try using Automation to reduce the outgoing signal level, or using a Compressor to reduce the signal level automatically. This way, you can work with interesting sounds and not harm your overall mix.

Fig 3.0

AudioGL makes programmable feedback loops possible by breaking the module system into three different types:

Master Modules

All of AudioGL's Modules are capable of being Master Modules. Master Modules have control over their amount of voices, and are part of the Main Connection System.

You can tell that a module is a Master Module by looking at its outer ring (See Fig 3.0). If the ring does not have a coloured outline, then it is a Master Module.

Many of AudioGL's modules are Master Modules by default, as they simply would not make sense within the context of a Feedback Loop.

Undecided Modules

Undecided Modules are modules which have just been created, but have not been placed in a larger synthesizer yet. They can be identified by a yellow ring around their circumference (Fig 3.0).

Currently, the following modules are Undecided upon creation: Equalizer Modules, Filter Modules, and the Distortion Module.

If you connect Undecided Modules to other Undecided Modules, they will remain Undecided.

As shown in fourth example from the top (Fig 3.0), once a string of Undecided Modules are connected to an Audio Input or Output, they will be converted to Master Modules.

As shown in the fifth example, when the Undecided Modules are connected to a Feedback Input or Output, they are converted to Slave Modules.

Slave Modules

Slave Modules are modules which are in a Feedback Loop. They are identified by red rings around their circumference.

The parameters in a Slave Module can be used to exact control over a Master Module's Feedback Loop.

Slave Modules have various limitations. A Slave Module, or a string of Slave Modules, cannot be connected to more than one Master Module. The connections on a Slave Module do not feature volume or panning controls. Finally, the polyphony of a Slave Module is automatically set by its Master Module, and cannot be changed manually.

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